E likes bamboo.
Georgia, 2011.

E likes bamboo.

Georgia, 2011.

Tags: Georgia Batumi

Tbilisi, Georgia. 2011.

Tbilisi, Georgia. 2011.

Marrakech, Morocco.

Marrakech, Morocco.

Rabat, Morocco. 2014.

Rabat, Morocco. 2014.

Tags: Rabat Morocco

whibwhub said: Do you have any recomendations of authors/books/articles to read that actually interrogate and describe the effects of oppression and discrimination on the pysche?

yourpersonalcheerleader:

wretchedoftheearth:

I do, actually! From a philosophical, psychological, or sociological perspective (and sometimes a mix of them), generally. Most of them are specific to racism (and many of those, to Black people), though I do have some more generalized recommendations. Some of these attack the issue head-on, while others are more tangentially related. I’ve quoted a lot of these on my blog and have noted it when I remembered to do so (but I tag most of my posts, so you could look for others in my tags).

Racism:

More general or not just racism:

Read More

Wonderful list, love! 

browngirlblues:

thepeoplesrecord:

Columbia student will carry her mattress until her rapist exits school
September 2, 2014

While most students at Columbia University will spend the first day of classes carrying backpacks and books, Emma Sulkowicz will start her semester on Tuesday with a far heavier burden. The senior plans on carrying an extra-long, twin-size mattress across the quad and through each New York City building – to every class, every day – until the man she says raped her moves off campus.

“I was raped in my own bed,” Sulkowicz told me the other day, as she was gearing up to head back to school in this, the year American colleges are finally, supposedly, ready to do something about sexual assault. “I could have taken my pillow, but I want people to see how it weighs down a person to be ignored by the school administration and harassed by police.”

Sulkowicz is one of three women who made complaints to Columbia against the same fellow senior, who was found “not responsible” in all three cases. She also filed a police report, but Sulkowicz was treated abysmally – by the cops, and by a Columbia disciplinary panel so uneducated about the scourge of campus violence that one panelist asked how it was possible to be anally raped without lubrication.

So Sulkowicz joined a federal complaint in April over Columbia’s mishandling of sexual misconduct cases, and she will will hoist that mattress on her shoulders as part savvy activism, part performance art. “The administration can end the piece, by expelling him,” she says, “or he can, by leaving campus.”

Read more

As painful as I know the constant reminder of attending school with her rapist must be, I’m glad she won’t be the only one forced to remember. I hope the rapist drops out immediately…or better yet, I hope he faces the justice he deserves. 

This is the length women have to go through to be heard

^ that.

(via vaganja)

Why are you a feminist?

For whatever reason, feminism has been coming up a lot in my life lately. Perhaps not so much feminism, as, well, privilege. Specifically, male privilege, and how it can make people feel unsafe and uncomfortable, and how it’s often hard to call out. And this is usually pictures and audio and other bits of my life, but I decided that this was important, too. It’ll be edited over the next few days to be a bit less of a rant and more coherent, but for now, here you go.

Why are you a feminist?

Because I believe in equal rights for all. Men and women and neither and both. 

Why aren’t you a “humanist”?

Because that’s a different thing entirely.

But, in seriousness, being a feminist means saying that yeah, there’s a problem with the patriarchy. It also means acknowledging that women—and trans* people, too!—are oppressed. It means that there’s a thing called “male privilege” and it exists and it’s very real to a lot of us. It also means speaking back against people who say that bad things happen to women because they should “lean in,” or try harder, or have kids earlier, or have kids later, or not have kids at all. It means saying that it’s tough to be perceived as female. And it’s not easy to say that.

But I don’t hate men. Feminists hate men.

I don’t hate men. I mean, some men, sure, but #notallmen. (See what I did there?) Acknowledging that privilege exists does not mean you hate everyone with that privilege. For me, it matters hugely what people do with the privilege(s) they have. Men—and even people who accidentally pass as male—have a privilege. Whether they want it or not. It’s just the way our society works. Does it meant that they don’t get oppressed in other ways? No. It just means that they have privileges that those who pass as female/not male just don’t have.

Some women don’t want to have sex with men, true, but those are lesbians. (Some of whom are feminists.)

But feminists hate women who have kids!

Some do, probably. But most are probably more campaigning for things like maternal health and maternity/paternity leave—something the US lacks.

But feminists are scary and do things like ____

I’m not with 100% of feminists. I’m probably not with 60%, to be honest. There’s a lot that feminism needs to work out. Like intersectional feminism. (And how white feminists need to make sure that we are very aware of all the other systems of oppression that we benefit from that hurt POC. Because we’ve been not good on that front. Not at all.) Or using Muslim women’s bodies as an excuse to colonize and go to war. Or serious issues with trans* inclusivity. But saying that all feminism is terrible, without thinking critically, is actually what feminists are angry about. Being a feminist means fighting back against a system that hates you. That system will, predictably, spit back at you, make you out to be the crazy one. There are feminists who do crazy things, bad things, terrible things—but dropping the movement completely should not be taken lightly. “Feminism” is a fluid label that anyone can claim, which comes with the territory in social movements. It’s both a problem and a great thing.

Feminists should do more to break the stereotypes that exist! If they didn’t actually hate men, why do I think they do?

Because you’re an uncritical asshat. Or, alternatively, you’re buying into a system that hates women. But sure, okay, let’s have that conversation. I’m not sure how anyone can honestly believe that all feminists hate men. And I’m also having trouble with telling feminists that, if they wanted more people on their side, they should really do more to address the SCUM stereotype. Expecting someone from an oppressed group to break a stereotype, constructed by an oppressing group, so you like them better is BS. (I mean, let’s take a second and think about your history classes. Women’s history get’s a month. It has to be worked in. Do you really think women’s rights movements/feminism is something that gets talked about as often as it ought?) So many things are feminist issues. Labor rights. Health care. Class. It’s all tied up, and feminists try and take it all on. That is, again, not to say that feminism is great all the time. It’s not. But think critically about how you hear about feminism, and who you hear it from. If it’s only FEMEN, you’re probably doing it wrong.

On a personal level, I find this argument—the “be less like what I envision you to be”one—insulting. I’ve been to feminist marches, campaigned for things like maternal care, protested those who sought to restrict access to sexual health services. I talk about feminism all the time. I try and live good politics, because that’s what I think good politics looks like. But in the end, it’s not my responsibility to sit with you while you decide if I’ve convinced you the stereotype is wrong or not. You’ve admitted it’s a stereotype, you have access to the internet, do some reading—some of the burden does fall on you.

But we live in an equal society!

No. We don’t. If this was real life, I’d walk away. Anyways. Wage gap? Street harassment? "Stop telling women to smile?" Ok, so what about, if a gun is in a woman’s home, her likelihood of dying a violent death increases by 270%. Any woman’s risk of intimate partner violence is 1 in 3. Or, because this is what happens when a woman tries to get another woman on the 10 pound note. Because a column about how tampons are taxed, and access to menstrual health products is a serious issue globally, ended with threats and vile comments.

My point is this: I am a feminist because male privilege is real. Patriarchy is real. Sometimes, there’s a helplessness about stuff that you cannot control. There is frustration in, when trying to explain to a male friend or relative, how you know exactly how your keys feel in your hand when you are walking home, or how terrible it is to be called “sweetheart” all the time, or how a good day is when no one makes any comments about you, or follows you too closely when you’re on your bike. I could list forever, but you either get the idea, or you won’t. I’m a feminist because there is strength in admitting that systems of oppression exist. Kidding yourself because the system of oppression wants you to is part of the problem.

I’ll end with this with a story. A year ago, I went running at night. I didn’t think anything of it—it was dinnertime, lots of people out, well-lit neighborhood. Someone followed me a bit, into a well-lit parking lot. Keep in mind, there are a fair number of people around; it’s early, and it’s near several bus stops. He laughed and said he was going to grab me. When I shouted back—because that was all I could do at that point—his response was, “I can do what I want. No one is going to stop me. Look.”

I’m a feminist because, after I went into the grocery store and cried, I realized: he was right.

Ben talks plant identification. We then fail to identify plants…oops.

Matthew waxes poetic about August.

Walthamstow Marshes, East London.

humansofnewyork:

Beginning tomorrow, I’ll be taking a 50 day trip in partnership with the United Nations, supported by the Secretary General’s MDG Advocacy Group. I’ll be posting portraits and stories from the trip on the blog. We’re calling it a ‘World Tour,’ because the trip will span over 25,000 miles and circumnavigate the globe. But since there are only ten countries on the itinerary, it would be rather foolish to claim that these portraits and stories somehow represent ‘the world,’ or humanity as a whole. The point of the trip is not to “say” anything about the world. But rather to visit some faraway places, and listen to as many people as possible. 
In addition to gathering portraits and stories, the purpose of the tour is to raise awareness for the Millennium Development Goals, which are pictured. The MDG’s are eight international development goals that every member state of the UN agreed we should accomplish by the year 2015. Basically: they’re stuff that everyone can agree the world needs. (More info can be found here: http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/). So in addition to telling stories of individuals, we hope this trip may in some way help to inspire a global perspective, while bringing awareness to the challenges that we all need to tackle together. Hope you enjoy.

humansofnewyork:

Beginning tomorrow, I’ll be taking a 50 day trip in partnership with the United Nations, supported by the Secretary General’s MDG Advocacy Group. I’ll be posting portraits and stories from the trip on the blog. We’re calling it a ‘World Tour,’ because the trip will span over 25,000 miles and circumnavigate the globe. But since there are only ten countries on the itinerary, it would be rather foolish to claim that these portraits and stories somehow represent ‘the world,’ or humanity as a whole. The point of the trip is not to “say” anything about the world. But rather to visit some faraway places, and listen to as many people as possible. 

In addition to gathering portraits and stories, the purpose of the tour is to raise awareness for the Millennium Development Goals, which are pictured. The MDG’s are eight international development goals that every member state of the UN agreed we should accomplish by the year 2015. Basically: they’re stuff that everyone can agree the world needs. (More info can be found here: http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/). So in addition to telling stories of individuals, we hope this trip may in some way help to inspire a global perspective, while bringing awareness to the challenges that we all need to tackle together. Hope you enjoy.

lsesu:

This weekend we were saddened to hear that on the morning of Saturday 2nd August, the Islamic University of Gaza (IUG), to whom the LSE Students’ Union (LSESU) is twinned, was targeted in an airstrike by Israeli military forces.

LSE Students’ Union has shared historic ties with the IUG that…

Huh. Proud to be LSE right now.

"We are waiting here to see if we are meant to live or die. Every day is another day of fear and destruction. If you don’t die, someone you know is likely to be among the dead. This is no life a human being can accept."

A Palestinian commenting on conditions inside Gaza. 

(Via +972 Mag)

(Source: thepoliticalnotebook)

Marrakech, Morocco.

Marrakech, Morocco.

Volubilis, Morocco.

Volubilis, Morocco.

Rabat, Morocco.

Rabat, Morocco.

Tags: Rabat Morocco